Phytodermatitis Slides 26 through 30

Reprinted with permission from the American Academy of Dermatology. All rights reserved. Please note that the slides are very large JPEG files that will take up to 6.5 minutes to view or download using a 28.8 kbps modem.

Allergic Contact Dermatitis

Allergic contact dermatitis requires previous sensitization to low molecular weight compounds in a plant. Not everyone develops an allergic reaction to these compounds. The most common plant causing this reaction is poison oak or ivy. The large family of plants, Compositae, contain chemicals called sesquiterpene lactones, which are sensitizers and irritants. Most of these rashes are chronic, eczematous rashes as compared to the severe blisters that develop from contact with the poison oak or ivy plants. Allergic contact dermatitis is the least common type of plant reaction except for problems with poison oak or ivy.

Slide 26

Burdock weed (Arctium lappa).

Burdock weed (Arctium lappa)

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Slide 27

Goldenrod plants (Solidago virga aurea).

Goldenrod plants (Solidago virga aurea)

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Slide 28

Tansy plants (Tanacetum vulgare).

Tansy plants (Tanacetum vulgare)

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Slide 29

Cornflowers (Centaurea montana).

Cornflowers (Centaurea montana)

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Slide 30

There are many varieties of Dahlia (Dahlia spp). The plant varieties are divided according to their shape.

Dahlia plant

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