Phytodermatitis Slides 36 through 40

Reprinted with permission from the American Academy of Dermatology. All rights reserved. Please note that the slides are very large JPEG files that will take up to 6.5 minutes to view or download using a 28.8 kbps modem.

Allergic Contact Dermatitis

Allergic contact dermatitis requires previous sensitization to low molecular weight compounds in a plant. Not everyone develops an allergic reaction to these compounds. The most common plant causing this reaction is poison oak or ivy. The large family of plants, Compositae, contain chemicals called sesquiterpene lactones, which are sensitizers and irritants. Most of these rashes are chronic, eczematous rashes as compared to the severe blisters that develop from contact with the poison oak or ivy plants. Allergic contact dermatitis is the least common type of plant reaction except for problems with poison oak or ivy.

Slide 36

Tulip bulb handlers develop a hyperkeratotic and fissured eczematous rash on the pulp of the fingers. The allergen in tulips, tulipalin-A, is present in all parts of the plants but has the highest concentration in the bulbs.

Tulip bulb rash on the fingertips

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Slide 37

Fissured fingertips result from stripping the leaves from the Alstroemeria plant. The major allergen is tuliposide-A which is converted to tulipalin-A. There are cross reactions to the tulip plants.

Alstroemeria rash in a florist

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Slide 38

Peruvian lily (Alstroemeria aurantiaca).

Peruvian lily (Alstroemeria aurantiaca)

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Slide 39

Fissuring of the fingertips and eczematous rash on the sides of the fingers from handling plant material.

Chronic hand dermatitis from handling plants

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Slide 40

The allergen in the geranium (Pelargonium zonale) is a compound called geraniol.

Geranium (Pelargonium zonale)

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