Abrasive Blasting

Photo courtesy of NIOSH. Abrasive blasting creates high levels of toxic dust like in this photo. Using alternative blasting materials such as dry ice, plastic bead media, sponges, or sodium bicarbonate (baking soda) can lessen toxic dust exposure

Abrasive blasting creates high levels of toxic dust like in this photo. Using alternative blasting materials such as dry ice, plastic bead media, sponges, or sodium bicarbonate (baking soda) can lessen toxic dust exposure.

Photo courtesy of NIOSH.

Are you in danger of becoming a statistic?

From setting up equipment to cleanup tasks, abrasive blasting operators, pot tenders, and other helpers face a variety of serious hazard issues, including the following:

  • Breathing silica, lead, and other potentially hazardous dusts from blasting materials, surface coatings, and substrates.
  • Exposure to excessive noise, especially when blasting is done inside tanks and enclosed spaces.
  • Dangerous work in confined spaces.
  • Increased risk for trips and falls due to working at heights and around hoses and other obstacles.

Expand or collapse. See more hazard exposures.

  • Possible eye and other impact injuries from the abrasive stream.
  • Flammable or combustible (explosive) dust accumulations.
  • Risk of inhaling fatal levels of carbon monoxide produced by overheated, oil-lubricated air compressors used to supply breathing air.
  • Risk for muscle strain and overexertion due to awkward postures and high-force grips.
  • Increased risk for heat stress due to personal protective equipment use.

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