Siding

Photo Courtesy of:  Thinkstock #177125057.  Using an alternative means, like the manlift in this picture, instead of ladders can make doing the job easier and safer. Remember workers still need to be trained on the safe use when operating a manlift, or other Ariel lifts.
Photo Courtesy of Thinkstock

Using an alternative means, like the manlift in this picture, instead of ladders can make doing the job easier and safer. Remember workers still need to be trained on the safe use when operating a manlift, or other Aerial lifts.

Every day workers who do installation or removal of siding on new or existing homes are exposed to injuries like amputations, cuts, falls, hearing loss, facial, and broken bones from hazards such as:

  • Coming into contact with power tools (nail guns, saws, etc.)
  • Dust Inhalation
  • Falls
  • Outdoor heat

Expand or collapse. See more hazard exposures.

  • Asbestos
  • Electricity (damaged cords and electrical outlets)
  • Heat Illness
  • Loud Noises
  • Overhead hazards (e.g., power lines, materials and tools)
  • Sharp objects (blades, knives, nail guns)
  • Silica
  • Slips and trips
  • Unguarded tools or machinery (e.g., saws)
These hazards can result in serious injuries or even death.

Information provided in this topic page can help employers and employees identify and evaluate existing and foreseeable safety & health hazards, and provide resources to help with training, prevention methods, and the development and implementation of a required written safety & health accident prevention program (APP).

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