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Verify a Contractor, Tradesperson or Business

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Tools for Contractors

Use our Verify tool to see if a business you want to contract with has an active contractor registration; an acvtive and paid-to-date workers' compensation account covering any employees. At the same time, you can check for safety violations, other information, lawsuits against their surety bond and more.

See more. Verify a Contractor, Tradesperson or Business

There, you can:

  • Look up subcontractors and tradespeople.
  • Verify a contractor has an active license.
  • Verify a tradesperson is certified.
  • Verify a contractor has an active workers' compensation account that is current.
  • See if the contractor has safety citations or other infractions.
  • Find out if they have any lawsuits against their bond.
  • Complete a tracking request for a subcontractor with an active workers' compensation account.
  • Print the “Certificate of Workers' Comp Coverage.”

You can search for a contractor by their:

  • L&I employer account ID or Contractor License Number.
  • UBI number (business license number) OR
  • Full or partial business or owners name.

Use these tools to learn about hiring subcontractors or “Independent Contractors” and avoiding prime contractor liability.

If you are a contractor hiring a subcontractor, be sure to complete a tracking request for those with active coverage. If the subcontractor fails to pay workers' comp premiums or renew their contractor registration, or if their electrical contractor license is suspended or revoked within one year of the request, L&I will send you a notification letter.

See more. Review your Tracking Requests. (If you have entered a tracking request for a subcontractor.)

See more. A Guide to Hiring Independent Contractors in Washington State

See more. Is your subcontractor really an employee?

You might be an employer and not know it.
In some cases, an “independent contractor” is actually a worker for whom you must do such things as pay workers’ compensation premiums, meet wage and hour requirements, pay unemployment tax, etc. Not understanding your requirements can leave your business vulnerable to unwanted penalties and even lawsuits.

More information

See more. Renew Your Registration

See more. Registering as a Contractor

 

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