Hazardous Waste Operations

Chapter 296-843, WAC

Effective Date: 05/01/04

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Sampling and Monitoring

WAC 296-843-130

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Your responsibility:

To conduct monitoring for health and safety hazards to protect employees

You must

Conduct monitoring for health and safety hazards during initial site entry

Evaluate employee exposure to hazardous substances during clean-up operations

WAC 296-843-13005
Conduct monitoring for health and safety hazards during initial site entry

You must

  • Make visual observations of the site to detect signs of actual or potential immediately dangerous to life or health (IDLH) or other dangerous conditions.
  • Conduct representative air monitoring with direct reading test equipment, when the preliminary site evaluation doesn’t eliminate the potential for ionizing radiation or IDLH conditions.
  • Assess the following:
    • – Potential IDLH conditions
    • – Exposure over radioactive material dose limits
    • – Potential exposure over permissible exposure limits (PELs) or other published exposure levels
    • – Other dangerous conditions, such as the presence of flammable or oxygen-deficient atmospheres.

Reference:

See WAC 296-62-09004, Ionizing Radiation, for additional information about radioactive material dose limits.


WAC 296-843-13010
Evaluate employee exposure to hazardous substances during clean-up operations

IMPORTANT:

The clean-up operation begins when soil, surface water, or containers are moved or disturbed.

You must

  • Identify the type of personnel monitoring and environmental sampling you plan to use, including instrumentation.
  • Include requirements for maintaining and calibrating the monitoring and sampling instruments used.
  • Monitor whenever employees may be exposed to concentrations exceeding PELs or other published exposure levels.
  • Evaluate employees who are likely to have the highest exposure:
    • – Monitor all employees who are likely to have the highest exposure to hazardous substances or health hazards above the PEL or published exposure limit
    • – Use personal sampling frequently enough to characterize the exposures of these employees.
        • When results indicate exposure is over the PEL or other published exposure level, identify all employees likely to be above the PEL or published exposure limit.

Note

Note:

You may use a representative sampling approach by documenting that the employees and chemicals chosen for monitoring are representative of both:

  • Employee exposure to hazardous substances

    and

  • Employees not sampled.

You must

  • Conduct monitoring when the possibility of one of the following exists:
    • – An atmosphere that’s immediately dangerous to life or health (IDLH)
      or
    • – A flammable atmosphere
      or
    • – Employee exposures exceeding PELs or other published exposure levels.

Examples of situations where these possibilities may exist:

– Work begins on a different portion of the site

– Contaminants other than those previously monitored are being handled

– A different type of site operation starts, such as moving from drum opening to exploratory well drilling

– Handling leaking drums or containers

– Working in areas with obvious liquid contamination such as a spill or lagoon

– Time has passed and employee exposure levels may have significantly increased.

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