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Restaurant Safety Materials

Teen-worker restaurant safety program materials

The following materials are provided to participants in the "Supervising for Safety" workshops with explanations and suggestions on how best to include them into health and safety programs. A short explanation for some of these items is included below.

NEW - Employing Teens Under 18 in Food Service?

Food Service Fact Sheet: Explains permitted and prohibited work activities for youth ages 14 to 17 in food service. Includes rules for driving, student-learner exemptions and work hours.

Rated R Sticker

This sticker can be used on any type of machinery prohibited for use by teens under age 18. Examples for use include meat slicers, compactors and paper balers, forklifts, powered tools, etc. You can print them yourself or order them by calling 360-902-5316 or email: teensafety@lni.wa.gov

  Sticker that says: 'This Equipment is Rated R -- No one under 18 allowed to operate this equipment'

 

Sample Accident Prevention Program for Restaurants

This document can be used to create an Accident Prevention Program for your Restaurant.
Sample Accident Prevention Program (Blank) (407 KB MS Word)

Safety Orientation Checklist

This form can be used for new employees but also for periodic review for current employees or whenever a new procedure or process is initiated.

Restaurant Employee Safety Orientation Checklist.

Safety Steps for Supervisors and Employees in Restaurants

A useful summary of the responsibilities both employers and employees share for a safe workplace. This can be shared with new employees during their initial orientation.

Safety Steps for Supervisors and Employees in Restaurants.

Best Practices Tip Sheets

The following items are best used as talking points during new-employee orientation and as review during crew safety meetings. They are not likely to be as useful as stand-alone posters without first using them in an interactive discussion or training session.

Acrobat PDF file Robberies and Abusive Customers: Tips for Preventing Injuries. (149 KB PDF)

Acrobat PDF file Ten Steps For Avoiding Burns. (139 KB PDF)

Acrobat PDF file Fryer Safety. (149 KB PDF)

Acrobat PDF file Ten Safe Handling Hints For Knifes. (112 KB PDF)

Acrobat PDF file Four Steps To Proper Lifting. (332 KB PDF)

Acrobat PDF file Preventing Slips And Falls. (139 KB PDF)

Acrobat PDF file Emergency Treatment of Burns. (36 KB PDF)

Model Shoe Policy

Slips, trips and falls are a major contributor to injuries in restaurants and are No. 1 for workers' compensation costs. As part of the best practices listed above for reducing these injuries, the WRA and L&I recommend that employers adopt a Model Shoe Policy. These specific elements are not required by L&I; however, if other methods are not successful in reducing such injuries, employers may be required to establish such a policy as part of their Accident Prevention Program.

Incident Tracking Form

There are many injuries or "near misses" that occur without requiring medical attention or a workers' compensation claim. However, these incidents can provide useful information to employers to identify potential problem areas and target elements of the workplace-safety program. Likewise, a reduction in these incidents can be more meaningful feedback than the number of workers' compensation claims alone.

Acrobat PDF file Incident Tracking Form. (9 KB PDF)

Other Program Materials

Additional materials are given to employers who attend the workshop and agree to some simple follow-up procedures such as incident tracking and crew safety meetings. Those employers will receive a Certificate of Completion signed by the Governor, as well as a window decal with the program logo recognizing their participation in this unique program.

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